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Looking for girlfriend > 25 years > How to find out what a person went to jail for

How to find out what a person went to jail for

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A party can usually determine why a defendant went to jail by searching the online database of the county jail that is holding the defendant. Often, she will be able to find a case summary for the defendant. A party can also find out why a defendant went to jail by calling the jail or agency that arrested the defendant. The jail should be able to explain how the defendant came into contact with law enforcement officers.

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Criminal Records

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A criminal record is the documentation that is created when an individual is convicted of a wrongdoing. Criminal records will include information on the arrest of the individual, the circumstances leading to the arrest, information on the individual arrested, their trial, the outcome of the trial should it result in a guilty verdict, incarceration, probation, parole information and more.

Criminal records can differ depending on the state, municipality, city, or county the record is created in. Each state has their own policy for storing, creating, and documenting the information on a convicted criminal. Information on criminal records through each of the 50 states and Washington DC can be found here:. Criminal records contain several different types of records, as well as information on the suspect themselves.

The following, if applicable, can be found in a criminal record providing the arrestee was convicted of a crime. The following reports and information can typically be found in a criminal record that has not been expunged or sealed or ones that have not been pardoned by a government officia l. An arrest record, or arrest report , makes up the section of a criminal record that covers the apprehension of a suspected criminal.

Arrests typically occur in one of two ways: as a result of a law enforcement agent witnessing an alleged crime, and as a result of an issuement of an arrest warrant. Regardless of the type of arrest, if an arrest occurs, there will be a record of that arrest. Arrest records are considered public records and are available at the municipal, city, county, and state level.

The public is able to look up arrest records as a matter of law. While some public records are free - such as census data, property information, and judgements - many can be difficult to find without the aid of government services or third party record amalgamation websites.

Truly free arrest records do not typically exist, though many arrest records are inexpensive. Costs such as copying fees, certification fees, and authentication fees may apply. An arrest warrant is a document that is signed and permitted by a judge , magistrate, or other court official in response to a request made by law enforcement agents or a district attorney. These documents permit the agency to arrest an individual named in the warrant at a certain time of day and in a certain place typically the suspects home.

In most average cases, law enforcement cannot force entry into a residence or private property without reasonable suspicion that evidence is being destroyed, a suspect is attempting to escape, or a person is being injured.

A warrant permits the law enforcement agent to enter without this suspicion, and secure any personal property they believe could serve as evidence. Arrest warrants typically do not differ in nature from city jurisdictions, county jurisdictions, and state jurisdictions. They contain the same information and permit the law enforcement agents who are responsible for the jurisdiction the same permissions. They only major differences are that law enforcement agencies are able to utilize the warrant, the width of the applicable jurisdiction, and the officials that are responsible for administering the warrant.

When a person is due to appear at trial, they must attend or face a bench warrant. Bench warrants allow police to forcibly bring a suspected criminal to trial to face ruling and judgement.

These types of warrants do not typically allow for bail, which allows a person to leave their containment facility in exchange for a fee. Felonies are considered by nearly all jurisdictions to be the most serious types of crimes. The use of state or federal prisons is significantly more common as a felony charge.

Common felonies include:. Felonies usually remain the same between municipal, city, county, and state jurisdictions. Often the punishments differ, but crimes will often be charged the same. Especially in the case of felonies: trials are conducted at larger jurisdiction courts such as country courts or district courts. City courts may handle felony trials if the city is large enough, but still utilize the same parameters as the state for crime definition.

Misdemeanors may differ between different jurisdictions, though they often remain the same as the next highest jurisdiction. Municipal law is based on county law, which in turn is based on state law.

There may be nuances at each level, but since crimes in a small jurisdiction have an opportunity to be tried at a higher level, punishments and parameters typically remain the same.

The only major difference is where a case will be tried, as a crime will most likely be tried in the same jurisdiction in which it was committed.

Some states have three categories of crime which include not only misdemeanors and felonies, but also violations or infractions. These types of offenses are particularly common in local, municipal, and city jurisdictions where traffic violations, public disturbance violations, and public indecency violations are more commonly enforced. Sex offenders are convicted criminals that committed crimes of a sexual nature.

This includes crimes like rape, which are focused on sexual abuse, and crimes like assault, which can be committed in a sexual manner. On a wider scale, the United States Department of Justice maintains a National Sex Offender Public Website where the public can search for sex offenders in their area as long as that area is in the United States.

Her attacker, Jesse Timmendequas was a sex offender with two prior convictions of sex crimes against young children, yet his identity as a sex offender was not well known to his community. Before the introduction of the bill, only 5 states required the registration and public knowledge of sex offenders. These sex offender registries can be accessed on a national, state, county, city, and municipal level.

The most common and frequently updated are typically county registries. Serious traffic violations refer to instances of crime that occur on the road that are more serious than the usual infractions and violations that occur behind the wheel. It can also refer to violations that are performed with excessive disregard, such as speeding at extremely high speeds, or violations that involve destruction of property, injury, or death.

Serious traffic violations typically result in large amounts of points on the license of the violator which in turn can result in forfeiture of driving rights. Conviction records are documents that detail the conviction of a criminal and all the events leading to the decision to convict. They are stored, like all public records, both digitally and physically. The physical location is usually the facility that issued the conviction, such as the trial court, magistrates court, or higher court. The same facilities often have online directories or search engines to help find a specific conviction record.

They also include information on both misdemeanors and felonies. In most states the answer is no. It is usually a legal violation if an employer refuses to hire a convicted person based on the conviction alone. Criminal court judgements are documents related to the sentences and decisions of the court in relation to a criminal court trial. This can contain information on jail and prison time, community service details, probation and parole information, details on mandatory courts and seminars, what rights are required to be forfeited, and more.

An example of this would be the decision to revoke driving rights from an individual that committed a serious traffic violation. Another is how felony criminals lose their right to vote in elections while serving their sentence.

When an individual is accused of a crime, it is the prosecution's duty to prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, that that person is guilty. This is settled in trial courts and hearings. Criminal trials are conducted for both misdemeanors less often and felonies more often. A state level trial for a felony will differ from a state or county level trial for the same. The general process of a criminal trial proceeds as follows.

These proceedings are documented in court documents and court records. This includes court dockets, sentences, judgements, and more. These are usually held by the court that rendered judgement.

Inmate records are documents held by incarceration facilities across the nation. They are typically maintained by state Department of Corrections departments in physical and digital databases. These are usually searchable online. They provide:. Probation is often given to convicted offenders by a judge instead of or along with incarceration, allowing the offender to be released back into the community under certain restrictions.

Like parole, probation is an alternative to incarceration but is different than parole because it involves conditions placed on an offender prior to or in lieu of serving jail time. If the conditions of probation are not met, then the offender may likely be incarcerated or provided with tougher conditions and fines. Offenders placed on probation are usually of minimal risk to society, unlike a person who served time in prison and is on parole. The conditions of parole vary widely and are sometimes outlined in statues or under the discretion of the judge.

The length of time an offender is placed on parole widely varies as well, anywhere from just the time it takes to pay off a large fine, to a few months or possibly several years. Some examples of probation conditions include fines, community service, education classes and having to report to a parole officer regularly. The parole conditions are determined by the state's board of pardons and paroles, which decides whether a convicted offender should be eligible to be released on parole or discretionary mandatory supervision and then outlines the conditions of that release if granted.

The boards often have specific guidelines used to determine whether an offender is capable of release or still remains a risk to society and also has the power to revoke parole if the outlined parole conditions are violated by the offender.

A parole board also recommends clemency matters, including pardons, to the governor. Juvenile criminal records are sealed criminal records not available to the public. They are exempt from the Freedom of Information Act. Juvenile criminal records include information regarding a juvenile or minor person under 18 years who were detained or found guilty of a crime as a juvenile.

Juvenile cases are treated differently than adult cases. When arrested, a juvenile is considered detained rather than arrested. When the juvenile goes to court, the case is adjudicated and a disposition is declared. The reason juvenile records are sealed is to protect the juvenile so that one mistake does not follow them for life. Acquittal : When the court hearing a case, formally absolves the defendant from blame in regards to the charges brought against them.

The defendant is found not guilty. Arrest Records: This is a record of all arrests-or stop and detainments-made by law enforcement of a criminal for committing a specific offense. This record typically offers the criminal charges owned by the arrest, the law enforcement arresting the individual, and the jurisdiction in which the arrest was made. Arrest Report: When a person is put under arrest for suspicion of a crime, a report is filed.

Arrest Warrant: When a court formally orders for the immediate arrest of an individual pertaining to a criminal case. Bail Bond : When an arrested individual cannot afford to pay their bail amount to get out of jail, they often contact third parties that loan them the bail money-with interest-and this is what is called: a bail bond.

Otherwise the alleged criminal is considered innocent. This means the burden of proof falls to the prosecution. They must prove that a person is guilty.

Find Out What a Person Went To Jail For

Please enable JavaScript in your web browser; otherwise some parts of this site might not work properly. You can look up inmates in two ways:. To do so, use the Online Detainee Locator System. Or, contact the field offices of the Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations.

There may be many reasons why you want to find out what a person went to jail for. You could have recently started dating someone and would like to find out their background.

A criminal record is the documentation that is created when an individual is convicted of a wrongdoing. Criminal records will include information on the arrest of the individual, the circumstances leading to the arrest, information on the individual arrested, their trial, the outcome of the trial should it result in a guilty verdict, incarceration, probation, parole information and more. Criminal records can differ depending on the state, municipality, city, or county the record is created in. Each state has their own policy for storing, creating, and documenting the information on a convicted criminal. Information on criminal records through each of the 50 states and Washington DC can be found here:.

Prisons and Prisoners

Finding out whether a friend or relative is in jail or whether someone who has recently been arrested is still in jail may seem daunting, but it can usually be done with a bit of time and patience. To find out if someone is in jail there are a number of resources you can use. You will need to gather some information about the person and do some searching, either online or over the telephone, but you will probably be able find the person you are looking for in the end. To find out if someone is in jail, try to gather as much information about the person as you can, like their full name, date of birth, gender, and hair color. If you find nothing, check the websites of neighboring counties in case the person in question is being held in a jail there. For tips from our Legal co-author on how to find out if someone is in prison, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Facebook.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Internet Uses : How to Locate Someone in Prison

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Feb 14, - Finding out whether a friend or relative is in jail or whether someone who has recently been arrested is still in jail may seem daunting, but it can.

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